The northern jaguar travels from a breeding population in northeastern Sonora, defying the U.S.-Mexico border wall to re-establish territory in the American Southwest. The journey, however, is an imperiled one; the jaguar’s historic travel corridor is fragmented by human activity, border wall expansion, and anti-predator policies. Un-Fragmenting / Des-Fragmentando is an interdisciplinary intervention that transforms the U.S.-Mexico border wall from barrier to backdrop, projecting jaguar and other borderland wildlife images from the Northern Jaguar Reserve and neighboring Viviendo con Felinos ranches directly on the rusted iron construct. Through binational cultural engagement, community education, and digital projection, Strohacker and collaborators confront the multifaceted ecological effects of the border wall and envision removing barriers to ensure the survival of a wide diversity of species, including the iconic jaguar.

Un-Fragmenting / Des-Fragmentando is a temporary public project made in collaboration with the Northern Jaguar Project (Tucson, AZ) and supported by Border Arts Corridor (Douglas, AZ), Casa de la Cultura (Agua Prieta, SON), Conciencia y Educación Ambiental (Hermosillo, SON), U.S. Border Patrol, the city of Douglas and the city of Agua Prieta.

Un-Fragmenting / Des-Fragmentando in USA TODAY's The Wall, an in-depth examination of Donald Trump's border wall. Featured in Roars and Silence: Creatures, and the wall that could silence them by Brandon Loomis. Photos by Mark Henle. 

There is an on-going effort on both sides of the border to grow the region's jaguar population. It's an effort that could be hampered by a wall. A USA TODAY Network video production. See more at https://www.usatoday.com/border-wall/

Un-Fragmenting / Des-Fragmentando in the New York Times series Borderlands. Featured in A Border Fence Blurred Through Art, by Erica Bernstein and Fernanda Santos. Click for video

 To many politicians, Americans and desperate migrants, the borderlands of the United States and Mexico are a land divided. But to the people who live there, the edges of these two countries are a binational Venn diagram where language, culture, family and business overlap.

To many politicians, Americans and desperate migrants, the borderlands of the United States and Mexico are a land divided. But to the people who live there, the edges of these two countries are a binational Venn diagram where language, culture, family and business overlap.